The Boys third season from Amazon Prime Video is wild, filled with twists, tons of nudity, and bloodshed. This season trumps deaths from previous seasons. The first episode left me shocked because I did not expect such an imaginative death. The Boys is so good because of the satirical nature of this superhero story. If the world had superheroes, this does not feel far off. The U.S. commodifies everything and packages it for capitalism. Sometimes, the parallels feel too close to reality, so some parts may be difficult to watch. 

Season 2 left off with viewers learning who the “head popper” was; Congresswoman Victoria Neuman (Claudia Doumit). She battles “supes” (superheroes) the supposed legal and proper way. Clueless of this, Hughie (Jack Quaid), tired of Butcher’s (Karl Urban) method that entails violence and torture, decides to join Victoria as her right-hand helper. Mother’s Milk (Laz Alonso) struggles to leave superhero hunting behind and be there for his daughter. Meanwhile, Butcher, Frenchie (Tomer Kapon), and Kimiko (Karen Fukuhara) adjust to working under Victoria and Hughie. Homelander (Anthony Starr) is dealing with the loss of Stormfront (Aya Cash) and the public ridicule. 

Characters Get Time To Shine

The Boys season 3 image Pictured (L-R): Tomer Capone (Frenchie), Karen Fukuhar (Kimiko)
Pictured (L-R): Tomer Capone (Frenchie), Karen Fukuhar (Kimiko) courtesy of Prime Video

Homelander continues to be one of the most disturbing villains. When Soldier Boy arrives, it feels like a competition for the worst person on the show with too many contestants. Starlight (Erin Moriarty) stands out this season. She assumes Hughie’s role of everyone’s conscience and does a better job. Butcher stays Butcher, for better or worse. 

Black Noir (Nathan Mitchell) gets more attention this season as well. We get a glimpse into how his mind works, and it is quirky yet sad. We also get more of Frenchie and the brutal but adorable Kimiko. The Boys blends ultraviolence and crudity with the whimsical and fantastical moreso this season. The women shined this season because they took care of problems. The men kept creating problems.

Uncanny World

The Boys season 3 image (L-R): Miles Gaston Villanueva (Supersonic), Erin Moriarty (Annie January aka Starlight), Antony Starr (Homelander)
Pictured (L-R): Miles Gaston Villanueva (Supersonic), Erin Moriarty (Annie January aka Starlight), Antony Starr (Homelander) courtesy of Prime Video

There are a plethora of superhero shows and movies, but few I consider accurate. By accurate, I mean how the world would look if superheroes were in the mix. There is Unbreakable, and Chronicle does great in feature films. For shows, The Boys has one of the most realistic depictions. Watching, you forget you’re this is a superhero show until someone lasers or flies. That is thanks to the cast and dialogue. They do not speak like superheroes except when their acting for an audience. 

 The aspect of capitalism, corporate commodification, and zealotry among fans is palpable. To say what transpires on the show is simply similar to our current events, downplays The Boys unsettling quality and impact. Yet, I also wondered about satire’s impact on audiences from different demographics as I watched. Some people might laugh, but others will sit with conflicting emotions as the show hurtles forward. 

Amazing Season, But A Challenge To Enjoy Right Now

The Boys season 3 image
The Boys season 3 image courtesy of Prime Video

There were moments I had to take a break and watch something funny to take my mind off the show. The show sometimes hits too close to home. Especially since I watched this season only days after horrific real-world events unfolded, hoping it would distract me from the rage and pain. Instead of finding relief, I felt uncomfortable the longer I watched. The Boys third season is a terrific satirical look at our world. But I am unsure if I was ready to witness it right now. 

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